Brixton Pound

Brixton Pound

Show Me The Money

Each paper Brixton Pound note commemorates a local hero, voted on by the people of Brixton, and celebrates our history, art, politics and culture. Brixton Pound is thankful to a number of people for helping with the design of the notes.

All of the notes contain a number of security features such as water marked paper by specialist secure printers, customized holograms, embossed numbering, and UV light illustrations.

To get hold of pristine, brand-spanking new, uncirculated notes as collectors items, please visit our shop.

5th Anniversary note:

Designed by Jeremy Deller, British artist who won the Turner Prize in 2004 and was selected to represent Great Britain at the Venice Biennale in 2013. This special edition B£5 is produced in collaboration with Fraser Muggeridge Studios. Deller has designed a special edition paper B£5 in celebration of the currency being five years old. His extraordinary design adds a significant and provocative message that reflects our intention to raise the conversation of how we understand, use and value money in this time of economic instability and what we could aspire to in the future. Read more about the note here, and check out the press coverage it got!


2nd Edition notes:

Designed by Charlie Waterhouse and Clive Paul Russell of the local design agency This Ain't Rock'n'Roll. In addition to a local hero all of the notes feature a design inspired by the iconic Coldharbour Lane Barrier Block and other Brixton influenced features. Top marks to those who guessed them!

Lenford (Len) Kwesi Garrison (1943 – 2003) - academic, community activist, and co-founder of the Black Cultural Archives. Garrison’s life’s work was to catalogue the development of the Black British identity and its history. He co-founded the BCA in the heart of Brixton Market, Coldharbour Lane in 1981. The back of the note features public street art from Stockwell Skate Park.

Stockwell Skate Park

Stockwell Skate Park, Stockwell Park Road | © Gavin Freeborn

Brixton Girl by Wrist 77 (Wayne Seales), a local graffiti artist born and bred in South London. He's been doing graffiti for over a decade now - he features regularly on the London graffiti scene and became well known for his characters, including the Brixton Girl. Check out more of his art on  https://instagram.com/wrist77 or www.flickr.com/wristone

 

The Barrier Block

The Barrier Block, Coldharbour Lane | © Gavin Freeborn

 

Luol Deng (born 1985) - professional basketball player for the GB national basketball team and the NBA’s Chicago Bulls and Miami Heat. Born in South Sudan, Deng emigrated as a child and moved with his family to Brixton. There he joined England’s 15-and-under basketball team at Brixton Basketball Club, marking the beginning of his basketball career. The reverse of the note is inspired by the Evelyn Grace Academy and features the Brixton Rec logo.

Brixton Recreation Centre

Brixton Recreation Centre, Brixton Station Road | © Gavin Freeborn

Evelyn Grace Academy

Evelyn Grace Academy, Shakespeare Road | © Gavin Freeborn

 

David Bowie (born 1947) - musician, actor, and record producer. A major figure and pioneer for over four decades in the world of popular music. Bowie and his family lived at 40 Stansfield Road, Brixton, from 1947-1953. He has sold an estimated 140 million albums worldwide. The back of the note is inspired by detailing from the Nuclear Dawn mural on Coldharbour Lane painted in 1983 during the peak of the Cold War.

Nuclear Dawn mural on Carlton Mansions

Nuclear Dawn mural on Carlton Mansions, Coldharbour Lane | © Gavin Freeborn

 

Violette Szabo, GC, MBE (1921 – 1945) - Second World War British secret agent. Born in Paris, she moved to London with her family and attended school, and later also worked in the Bon Marché department store in Brixton. Szabo was involved in a number of dangerous missions in France during the war, depicted in the 1958 film ‘Carve Her Name with Pride’. She paid the ultimate price for her heroism. The reverse of the note is inspired by public street art from Electric Avenue: 'Foxes & Cherries' by Lucy Casson and 'Brixton Speaks' by Will Self.

 'Foxes and Cherries'

'Foxes and Cherries'

'Foxes & Cherries', Electric Avenue | © Gavin Freeborn 

'Brixton Speaks'

'Brixton Speaks', Electric Avenue © Gavin Freeborn

1st edition notes:

Many wonderful Brixton people contributed to the first edition notes, they are similarly jam-packed with the work of a number of Brixton creatives as well as some iconic Brixton inspired images. The notes were designed by Rob Adderley. The background images on the front of the notes are taken from Lambeth Archives. The illustrations along the bottom of the notes were designed by Ceri Buck of the Invisible Food Project, and they glow under UV light! The engravings on the back of the notes feature engravings by Staffan Gnosspelius of the market and other Brixton scenes. Hannah Lewis of The Remarkery was in charge of overseeing the design process and bringing together the group of people involved.

 

 

Olive Morris (1952 – 1979) - a radical political activist and community organiser who established the Brixton Black Women’s Group, and played a pivotal role in the squatters' rights campaigns of the 1970s; Olive was born in Jamaica in 1952 and moved with her family to Britain aged 9. She was a Brixton resident from 1961-1975 and died at the age of 27 from cancer. The image is from the Remember Olive Morris Project.

James Lovelock, CH, CBE, FRS (born 1919) - independent scientist and environmentalist who, whilst working for NASA, first developed the Gaia hypothesis, proposing that the earth is in a delicate but dynamic steady-state that human activity is disturbing, in particular through global warming. Brixton resident from 1925-1933. The image was provided by James Lovelock himself.

C.L.R. James (1901 – 1989) - Trinidadian journalist, historian, socialist thinker, and anti-colonialist who chose to spend his final years on the ‘front line’ of Brixton. Photographer Steve Pyke provided the photo of C.L.R. James - the image on its own can be seen here.

Vincent Van Gogh (1853 – 1890) - painter who moved to Brixton aged 20, reportedly returning to Holland a changed man, having seen firsthand the impacts of poverty on his daily walk from Brixton to Covent Garden. The image is an online copyright free version.